Tag Archives: Social Issues

Voting: An Infantile Disorder

by Isaac Peachey, ’16

As the presidential election approaches, many young voters are preparing to cast a ballot for the first time. By supporting the candidate of their choice, some teens genuinely believe that they will make a difference. This upcoming election, more so than others, will be a very important year for those who lean toward reformism. With issues such as universal healthcare, mass incarceration, police brutality, war, and education, there is a collective wish to finally witness a change in the system. However, the unfortunate truth is that voting is an act of futility.

ASD Introduces New Medical Marijuana Policy

by Kara-Lynn Valliere, ’16, and Noah Libby, ’16

Due to a new medical marijuana policy, students with a certificate will be able to consume the drug during school.

Due to a new medical marijuana policy, students with a certificate will be able to consume the drug during school.

In response to a recently passed state law, a new medical marijuana policy is being introduced in the Auburn School District to help students suffering with conditions such as cancer, attention deficit disorder, and epilepsy.

The Shirt Off Their Backs: EL Clothes Closet Helps Students Stay Warm

The Clohtes Closet contains winter jackets and sweaters students who need them.

The Clohtes Closet contains winter jackets and sweaters students who need them.

By Shannon Brown, ’16

In the basement of Edward Little High School, near the food pantry, there is a small room filled with racks and boxes of clothes. The clothing has been donated by teachers, students and community organizations so that the students of EL who need clothes will have them.

EL Students Carry Soldiers’ Memories to Mountain Summit

By Shannon Brown, ’16, and Haley Knowlton, ’17

As the morning air held the chill of early winter and snow that had fallen early that morning clung to the branches, a number of Edward Little High School juniors hiked up Bradbury Mountain in Pownal. The students were carrying stones –each engraved with initials, a rank, branch of service, and two dates – to the mountain’s peak that November morning as part of The Summit Project, a local organization that honors fallen Maine soldiers.

The path up to the summit was covered in mud and slush, making it a slippery climb for the ELHS students. Melting snow would occasionally drop down onto the backs of students on the path. Students would often stop to trade off carrying their soldier’s stone, so that everyone would get an opportunity to share the burden and responsibility.

“I feel very honored,” Jacqueline Dyer said when asked how she felt about carrying the veteran’s stone.

The Struggles of Being a Girl

By Danica Nadeau, ’15

Women have been fighting to be treated equally for decades. We can't give up the fight. We have to keep fighting harder to make sure we don't get looked over anymore.

Women have been fighting to be treated equally for decades. We can’t give up the fight. We have to keep fighting harder to make sure we don’t get overlooked anymore.

Women are more than just objects, but in today’s society, often all we are viewed by is our level of attractiveness. Today, it is common to hear men saying, “I like curvy women,” or “I enjoy thick women,” or “I prefer skinny ladies.” Women fail to be acknowledged for their personality and successes.

As a senior in high school, I have never, and by never I seriously mean never ever, heard a male say, “She is very funny and nice, I want to get with her.” However I have heard, “She is so hot, I gotta hook up with that.” How is that possibly considered socially acceptable? Newsflash, “gentlemen,” it isn’t. It may be difficult to realize, but being a woman in today’s society is exceedingly more difficult than what we might allude to. We are constantly judged by the way we dress and the way we present ourselves and it is impossible to please everyone, no matter how much we may desire to.

The Smackdown of Smack High and Snapchat

By Devin Dumont, ’16

Smack High is an app geared toward high school students that allows users to anonymously post messages. The posts quickly turned into cyberbullying, though.

Posts on Smack High by anonymous students quickly turned into cyberbullying.

In October, Edward Little High School forced students to remove the applications Snapchat and Smack High from their iPads. The consequence of not deleting these apps would be that they would restrict every app on your iPad, which means the iPad would be useless. You would be unable to do any work and unable to turn in work that’s already finished.

Snapchat is an app where people can take a picture, write a small caption with it and send it to anyone they wish who also has Snapchat. The photos then essentially self-destruct after a few seconds. Smack High is a Website, app, and Twitter account. On Twitter, users can submit anything that they want that’s either bashing another student or teacher, or submit something that’s bashing another school. This has to go through the person who’s running the Twitter account, on the app however, as long as a user has an account, they can post anonymously without anyone determining if it is appropriate.

Edward Little Goes Green(house)

By Ashley Bowden, ’14

Students in Kim Finnerty's Chemistry Through Agriculture class plant seedlings in the new greenhouse.

Students in Kim Finnerty’s Chemistry Through Agriculture class plant seedlings in the new greenhouse.

In the past year, Edward Little High School has added a unique, interactive hands on class to the schedule. Science teacher Kim Finnerty’s Chemistry through Agriculture class built and is now running a brand new greenhouse.

“The greenhouse is part of the agriculture in the classroom grant that I wrote,” Finnerty said. “I wrote the grant because I believe agriculture is a way I can engage students in the subject of chemistry. The agriculture students are using it to germinate seeds. These seeds will become vegetable and flower plants that will then be given to area schools and non-profit organizations for their raised bed gardens.”

Students Get Dose of Reality at Mock Accident

By Ashley Bowden, ’14

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ELHS strives to show students the dangers of drinking and driving by teaming with a full team of local first responders, even a medical helicopter, to make his Mock Accident as realistic as possible

Every two years, during prom season, Edward Little High School conducts their annual Mock Accident. The program recreates a fatal accident to show students the consequences of drinking and driving. Last week, as students came upon the dramatic accident scene in the lower parking lot, they saw two wrecked vehicles, one flipped on its roof, with multiple students injured and one lying “dead” on the asphalt, covered in fake blood.

“It was very realistic,” said senior Brei Cote. “Definitely showed people the reality of what can happen if you drink and drive. It’s no longer a joke.”

“I Hated Myself as Much as They All Hated Me”: How Bullying Tore Apart the Life of One EL Student

By Ashley Bowden, ‘14, and Rahma Ali, ‘15

This post, and the following response, sparked a string of online bullying directed at Rousseau. It was the latest attack in what has become a years long battle with bullying.

This post, and the following response, sparked a string of online bullying directed at Rousseau. It was the latest attack in what has become a years-long battle with bullying.

During her freshman year, Edward Little High School senior Tori Rousseau said she overheard a boy threatening to push a blind student down the stairs, saying, “She won’t even see it coming.” Rousseau told the boy “to grow up and act his age,” she said.

She didn’t realize, in that moment, that her attempt to stop the harassment would affect the rest of her high school years and that trying to help someone else would end up coming back to harm her in the end. “The bullies would tease these students, so I said something, but it backfired on me and I became their next victim,” she said.

Young adults are always encouraged to stand up and speak out against bullying. They are expected not be bystanders, but to be the solution. Contrary to most adults’ beliefs, it’s not taking action that scares teens, it’s the fear of becoming the next target.

Bullying: A Serious Issue That Needs to End

By Ashley Bowden ‘14

    Bullying is a recurring issue that just won’t seem to go away. Do people not understand how even one simple insult can affect someone? That what you see as “joking around” can do real damage? Bullying has worsened over the years, thanks to new technology and social media. Now, once someone is caught in the middle of something, they often feel stuck and hounded by their bullies day and night, thanks to the internet.

    Bullying is when someone forces, threatens, abuses, intimidates, or aggressively dominates another person. The definition sounds all fancy and makes it sound like it’s just a worst-case scenario. However, calling someone a name, making a joke, a dirty look, no matter how simple or meaningless it seems, is still considered bullying.

    Bullying changes over the years. It’s starts with just some basic teasing on the playground at recess and soon develops to the occasional shove or physical altercation, and as students keep getting older both the physical and emotional abuse often become stronger and more frequent. When students hit the right age that their parents allow them access to social media and online access, it gets easier for the bully to hide behind the anonymity of the internet and easier for the bullied to remember every detail and remind themselves of it.