Bridge Program Connects High School to College

By Hannah Stauffer, ’17

The Bridge Program, a recent addition to Edward Little High School, allows juniors and seniors to take college courses in English, history, science, and math. The program allows students to earn college credit before graduating high school, giving them a jump-start on their post-high school goals.

Eddies Hold Election for 2016-2017

by Eddies Echo Staff

Elections for the executive boards for the Classes of 2017, 2018, and 2019 were held on June 1.

Current incumbents included:
Juniors: President Noah Yarnevich and Vice President Marshall Chadbourne
Sophomores: President Patrick Luizzo and Vice President Nick Hathaway
Freshmen: President Caleb Yarnevich and Vice President Ethan Brown

After the ballots were counted the newly elected officials would begin their term starting later this fall. The new officials include:

Administration, Students Unclear on Safety Procedures

By Sydnee Harris, ’16 and Kaily Baril, ’16

Since the start of this school year, there have been fifteen school shootings in the United States. In five of those cases, the shootings either started or took place in a public area within the school, like a cafeteria, library, or courtyard. A recent inquiry by the Eddies Echo into lockdown procedures at Edward Little High School made it clear that the lockdown procedures for the cafeterias are dangerously unclear.

Extra Curricular Activities Add Value to EL

by Bilal Hussein, ’18

Here at Edward Little, extra-curricular activities do not get as much of the attention as sports do. From band, to drama, many students embrace different activities that they enjoy and yet it seems they get little to no attention compared to sports.

“I see a resurgence for the excitement for the band,” band teacher Bill Buzza said. After the All-City Band Concert on March 22, many of the audience members were amazed by the professional demeanor and talent the children from grades 5 to 12 had to show at Edward Little High School. The high school’s band was lead by Buzza, who explained “there’s a lack of interest” in the band, which “is not as popular as it used to be.” With all the negatives, there must be some positivity for the band.

Vanna Stares into the Void

On June 16, 2014, Vanna released their fifth album

On June 16, 2014, Vanna released their fifth album, Void.

By Raquel Crockett, ’18

Vanna is a popular band from Boston, Mass., whose music style and genre of the band is are mainly post-hardcore, hardcore punk, and melodic hardcore.

The band consists of five members: Davey Muise, Nicholas Lambert, Joel Pastuszak, Shawn Marquis, and Seamus Menihane.

The band was founded by Nicholas Lambert and former member Evan Pharmakis, the guitarists, in December 2004, and recorded their first demo in Lambert’s dorm room. Soon after, they recruited bassist Shawn Marquis, drummer Brandon Davis, and vocalist Joe Bragel. Lead vocalist Muise, who joined the band in 2009, gave a motivational speech at ELHS this past winter, an event orchestrated by EL students who invited him to speak about drug use and suicide prevention.

EL Alum Rolls into Collegiate Bowling

Class of 2014 alum Brandon Dubuc bowls at the collegiate level for the University of Pikesville in Kentucky.

Class of 2014 alum Brandon Dubuc bowls at the collegiate level for the University of Pikesville in Kentucky.

By Avery Goulding, ’19

Four years, four seasons, yet it only took one year of teamwork, confidence and passion to set Brandon Dubuc’s goal for a lifetime. Dubuc, a 2014 ELHS alumnus and current student at the University of Pikeville in Kentucky, recently shared his long road to collegiate bowling.

Dubuc knew he wanted to carry bowling with him for the rest of his life after just one season in the EL bowling program, which is united with Lewiston, Leavitt, and Lisbon. “We came from four different high schools,” Dubuc said, “and we all fit together really well.”

Principal James Miller Announces Retirement

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Principal Jimmy Miller, center, stands with students during a recent pep rally. The students held signs honoring Mr. Miller as they watched a video about his impact on EL students and staff.

by Colby Birkbeck, ’16, and Evan Emerson, ’16

Recently, Principal James Miller III of Edward Little High School announced that he would retire at the end of the school year. “After 42 years of being in high school,” he said, “it’s time to graduate.”

Over the years, he made teaching not only his profession, but his hobby, Miller said. He never had the time to go hunting, or go fishing, or any other hobbies, because he put all of his time into teaching. Finding something to do is going to be his biggest challenge come retirement.

Finding Your Passion

by Avery Goulding, ’19

The author started bowling at age 5, and the sport has become her passion.

The author started bowling at age 5, and the sport has become her passion.

I grew up playing one particular sport, bowling. I dabbled in many other sports, but I still always came back to bowling, which I carried with me from age five. It wasn’t always easy, though. Early on in my ten-year journey with bowling, I found myself wanting to quit. I just wasn’t enjoying it anymore because I didn’t feel like I was good enough or really getting any better. After thinking about it a lot I decided to quit for a year, to relieve some of the pressure and experience what it would be like to get off the lanes and have more free time.

I can tell you, now, it wasn’t as great as I thought it would be. I missed my friends, the tournaments, the early Saturday morning league, and, most of all, the general environment. It was, after all, where I spent a majority of my time growing up. So what I decided to do was dedicate my entire summer to practicing. Unfortunately, jumping into this method still wasn’t getting me anywhere, because I figured I could just teach myself to be better. I was too shy and probably too embarrassed to ask for help.

Auburn School Department’s All-City Band Concert

by Colby Birkbeck ’16

The annual All-City Band Concert took place on Tuesday, March 22, in the Edward Little High School gymnasium. The schools present include Sherwood Heights, Auburn Middle School, and the ELHS Band, who played a variety of classic and contemporary songs.

Digital Learning: Two Steps Forward, Three Steps Back?

By Avery Goulding, ’19

As I make my way through high school, I’ve come across a very different type of algebra along with a completely different array of teaching styles, and I’ve realized that algebra is no longer really the algebra I remember. The math we students grew up on has been tainted to fit many new learning techniques. Students are no longer taught traditional formulas or encouraged to practice mnemonic devices in order to retain the information. The result: the new methods have made algebra even more challenging.

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ALEKS is an online learning program used by the math department at ELHS.

Entering high school, I was expecting a more in-depth explanation of algebra with the helpful hand of a qualified teacher to really explain the material to me so I, as a student, could get the full learning experience I needed to succeed in this subject. Considering I struggled with the material in the first place, I was in need of a little extra help. Instead, students were placed into an online learning program intended to give them an “at your own pace” experience, yet expected to complete so many topics within the site in a certain amount of time. Not only does this stress students out because they feel like they aren’t smart enough to the complete the work in the given amount of time, but it doesn’t give them a fair chance to receive the amount of attention and focus they deserve to completely understand the work. Teachers aren’t always able to get to every kid in the class, not to mention everyone is in a different position on this website which makes it hard to reach out to other students if they need to as well.