Monthly Archives: December 2013

“Links” Inspire Kindness at EL

By Ashley Bowden, ’14

Science teacher Kim Finnerty works on adding another segment to the Links of Kindness chain that is now close to wrapping around the entire first floor.

Science teacher Kim Finnerty works on adding another segment to the Links of Kindness chain that is now close to wrapping around the entire first floor.

For the past few weeks, science teacher Kim Finnerty has been working on a project called Links of Kindness, an activity in which students and staff have been asked to write a kind thought about someone or something on a piece of construction paper and they are being combined to make a one long chain, a chain she is working on wrapping around the entire school.

“I believe that each day it is important to remember the good things,” Finnerty said. “During this time of year everyone gets so very busy, we often forget to hold the door open for the person behind us or say ‘excuse me’ when we bump into someone. I wanted to make sure I took time to be kind and I thought we all could use this.”

Freshman Mackenzie Tufts likes the impact it has on the student body. “I think the links of kindness was a really sweet idea,” she said. “People are usually more eager to be mean to others than to say nice things, so I think it makes them a little more positive.”

Pies for a Cause

Edward Little students got a second opportunity to throw pies at teachers, as English teacher Jen Braunfels’ American Literature class hosted another pie throwing fundraiser. The event raised funds for the Edward Little food pantry and the Lunchbox Fund, an organization that provides daily meals to students in South Africa. Yesterday’s event raised $97 for the two organizations.

Далеко от дома: A Long Way From Home

Rahma Ali ’15

Darima Dashidondokova, a foreign exchange student at Edward Little High School this year, comes from a small town called Aginskoye in Russia, just north of Mongolia.

Darima Dashidondokova enjoys the pep rally in September. The Russian exchange student has steeped herself in life at Edward Little.

Darima Dashidondokova enjoys the pep rally in September. The Russian exchange student has steeped herself in life at Edward Little. “Spirit week was amazing,” she said. “I felt myself part of EL…I love the spirit of this school. “

   Dashidondokova went to Aginskoye Okrug Gymnazium, her school back home. In Russia, students finish high school in 11th grade. Classes there are 45 minutes long and students usually have six classes a day.  At her old school, they didn’t have any art classes, only “serious stuff,” as Dashidondokova likes to call it. First to eighth grade students wear maroon uniforms, and ninth to eleventh grade students wear black uniforms.

Letter to the Editor: Community Service a Burden, Better Options Available

I completely agree with Bryan Koester’s article on community service (“Community Service: A Benefit or a Detriment?” Nov. 22). The idea of community service is to take the time we want to volunteer and give back to the community. But is a requirement to graduate still considered volunteer work? I personally found it hard to make time for community service with the busy schedule I have.

All through high school I have had to make time for so many things and that got hard. This year is my senior year in high school and I had to rule something out to make time for my new job as a nursing assistant. So first on my list to go was cheerleading. I have been a cheerleader for four years. With balancing school, homework, working, making time for friends and family, and also helping out around the house, I couldn’t continue the sport. Now, imagine my surprise when I forgot I had to do 24 hours of community service my senior year, as well.

‘Tis the Season, but Not Just Christmas

By Ashley Bowden, ’14

We all know that this time of year means, instead of hearing “Have a nice day” as you leave a store, you hear, “Merry Christmas” or “Happy Holidays.” I prefer to hear the second one.

I realize that this year Hanukkah and Christmas don’t run together and Hanukkah was during Thanksgiving – which by the way won’t happen for a very long time so I’m happy to have lived through this one – but that’s not the point. But it’s like this every year. I hear “Merry Christmas” over “Happy Holidays.”

Alice 19th: Fun Trip Down the Rabbit Hole

By Shayna Barnhard

Alice 19th, a series available in the EL library, is an interesting, engaging read.

Alice 19th, a series available in the EL library, is an interesting, engaging read.

At the beginning of the school year, during study hall, I went to the school library to check out a book.  At first,I didn’t know what I wanted to read.  I also went to clean up the library a little.  It turned out Ms. McCurdy needed someone to organize the manga from the graphic novels.  As I was organizing, I found this manga “Alice 19th.”  It seemed interesting, so I checked out the first book and read it.  It was different from other mangas I’ve read, but it was good.  As I read the other books, it got better and better.

“Alice 19th” is about a 15-year-old girl named Alice who, while walking to school, saves a rabbit from getting run over.  After she saves the rabbit, Alice receives a bracelet with a red stone on it.  It’s revealed the white rabbit isn’t any ordinary one, she reveals her real form, a little girl with rabbit ears, dressed in robes, named Nyozeka.  Nyozeka tells Alice that she’s destined to be a Lotis Master and the stone on Alice’s bracelet is one of the Lotis word “Rangu,” the 19th Lotis meaning “courage” (now you know why the series is called Alice 19th).

Surfing the Internet > Your Future?

 By Danica Nadeau, ’15

Give me ALL the Internets! Students often have a hard time managing the many distractions technology allows them, which could hard their future.

Give me ALL the Internets! Students often have a hard time managing the many distractions technology allows them, which could harm their future.

Breaking news! Research shows that children are slowly becoming more addicted to technology! Oh wait….that’s not new, but it has been developing at an astonishing rate recently. Children today know more about iPhones and iPads than they do about the alphabet or even colors. Don’t get me wrong, those devices can be used for good purposes, like teaching children how to count, read, and some social skills, but is it really that bad to keep it old school? The correct way a child should learn is by one-on-one contact with someone, and with hands-on activities to stimulate their mental growth.

Want to be Happy? Be Grateful

By Bryan Koester, ’14

Could being thankful save you from a life of depression? Probably not, but it could help.

To be grateful is to be thankful and content with what we have. To show appreciation to those who care for us by performing services and helping us out in the world. But what does the word really mean to us?

Many psychologists have begun studying gratitude and their results are rather eye opening. According to an article on the Georgia Psychological Association website,  “Although happiness is sometimes viewed as a state that can be reached by achieving some goal or acquiring some possession (e.g.,’I would be happy if only _____’), psychological research suggests that happiness is more related to being grateful for what we already have.”

So, to break that down a little, you get less happiness from the new things you get, and more from what you already have and are thankful for.

Snapchat: Where Immature Teenagers can be Themselves

By Ashley Bowden, ’14

Ah, yes, Snapchat. Almost every teen out there knows what this is, whether they love it or hate it. It’s a simple concept really. You take a picture and can write a caption or draw on it, set a timer for one to ten seconds and send it to your friends. Is it kind of ridiculous? Sure. But hey, we’re teenagers, ridiculous is what we do.

Snapchat isn’t something where there is a gray area for an opinion. You either love it or hate it. Is it used inappropriately and at the wrong times? Sometimes. Once again though, we’re teenagers and the whole idea of knowing the picture will disappear once that timer runs out is pretty tempting.

Snapchat: The Trend That Won’t Die Fast Enough

By Trevor Laliberte ’16

First off, teenagers have never been the most mature, attentive, or responsible humans – ever. This has been proven time and time again. The technology of this decade has now provided a new outlet for this generation’s irresponsibility: Snapchat.

Snapchat is a simple and dangerous concept, one that should go the way of Myspace and AOL Instant Messenger.

Snapchat is a simple and dangerous concept, one that should go the way of Myspace and AOL Instant Messenger.

The concept is so simple that most pigeons could probably understand it, which explains why it appeals to people with the same IQ as said birds. In a nutshell, it’s another mobile app that allows you to communicate with your idiot friends and send pictures. The catch? The pictures disappear after a few seconds, lost in cyberspace, never to be seen again.